Seminar: Can Scotland and England Rub Along?

Irrespective of whether Scotland votes Yes or No in the referendum on three months time, its future will depend in part on how it gets along with its near neighbour, England. The SNP’s vision for an independent Scotland envisages various forms of collaboration with the rest of the UK that may or may not be forthcoming. All three unionist parties are proposing further constitutional change for Scotland to which it is presumed the rest of the UK will acquiesce. But does public opinion in the two countries provide the basis for such co-operation? And irrespective of the particular form that Scotland’s future government takes, are governments north and south of the border likely to be under pressure to pursue divergent public policies, thereby creating potential strains in their relationship, or are social and political attitudes sufficiently similar on both sides of the border for any necessary accommodation and compromise to be possible?

Professor John Curtice will address these questions, using in part newly published evidence from the British Social Attitudes survey on what England thinks about its future relationship with Scotland.

Can Scotland and England Rub Along?

Speaker: Professor John Curtice

Date: Thursday 19th June 9.30am-11am

Location: Raeburn Room, Old College, University of Edinburgh.

How to book your place

Please complete the booking form at the bottom of this page and return to Mags Tingey, Institute of Governance, University of Edinburgh, Chisholm House, High School Yards, Edinburgh EH1 1LZ or by email Margaret.tingey@ed.ac.uk

Cost: £25 per seminar.

Enquiries: Margaret.tingey@ed.ac.uk or 0131 650 8093

Further information

Registration is at 9am and the seminars will run from 9.30am-11am.

A map can be viewed here.

The briefing will be prefaced by a short presentation on the state of the latest referendum polls.

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